What the FERC is going on with gas policy and regulations?

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What the FERC is going on with gas policy and regulations?

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is starting the new year with a 2-2 partisan split after former Chairman Richard Glick was forced to bid adieu to the agency after his renomination stalled out. The divide could complicate action on some of the thornier issues before the agency, and there is a risk of 2-2 deadlocked votes that could stall project authorizations.

S&P Global senior editor Maya Weber joined the podcast to break down what's happening at FERC and what its agenda could mean for natural gas producers and other stakeholders. She also shed light on climate actions being pursued by the Biden administration that could impact the gas sector and provided some clarity on whether President Joe Biden is really trying to ban gas stoves.

Stick around after the interview for Chris van Moessner with the Market Minute, a look at near-term oil market drivers.

Related content:

New FERC chair sets sights on reliability, transmission, environmental justice (premium content)

White House guidance on GHGs could add to friction for natural gas projects (premium content)

Biden to tap Phillips to head US FERC until permanent chair is confirmed: WH official

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